Our youth and local leaders lead participatory research to better equip our community with the knowledge and solutions needed to drive positive change. Whether it’s releasing a report on anti-violence recommendations, testifying before New York City Council or presenting at conferences, RHI is changing the narrative.

Young Adults’ Experiences of Violence and Dreams of Community-Led Solutions in Red Hook, Brooklyn

We are a group of young adults from Red Hook. We grew up in this community witnessing violence, disinvestment, and over-policing. In the summer of 2017, we came together because we were tired of being ignored and harassed and because we were ready to make a change. We took matters into our hands and launched a research study about violence and community-building for young adults in Red Hook. The research was conducted by us, with us, and for us.

Young Adults' Experiences of Violence and Dreams of Community-Led Solutions in Red Hook, Brooklyn

The Impact of Mold on Red Hook NYCHA Tenants

In 2016, RHI rallied Red Hook residents, through Participatory Action Research, to explore the impact of mold on tenants of the Red Hook Houses of the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA). The decision to develop a survey on NYCHA residents’ experience with mold in their homes came from an urgent community call for action. While Hurricane Sandy exacerbated mold problems in deteriorating NYCHA buildings, Red Hook NYCHA tenants have suffered from the health hazards associated with mold for years with no respite despite similar findings in the past, including the 2009 Red Hook Community Health survey and the 2014 Weathering the Storm: Rebuilding a More Resilient NYCHA post-Sandy. Mold is contributing to a public health crisis. Years after Hurricane Sandy, Red Hook residents continue to suffer from a crisis that existed before the storm and continues today. Research shows that long-term exposure to mold can make healthy people sick. The outcomes of our survey demonstrate a public health crisis for Red Hook residents and the need for a comprehensive response.

The Impact of Mold on Red Hook NYCHA Tenants

A Community Response to Hurricane Sandy

On October 30, 2012, when Hurricane Sandy left thousands of residents of the NYCHA Red Hook Houses without electricity, heat, or running water, but left our center unharmed, our staff and participants did what they had done every day since our founding—they organized and took action to respond to the needs of their own community. They were quickly joined in their efforts by a flood of support from thousands of volunteers, community agencies, elected officials, corporations, and donors. The response in Red Hook was a testimony to the power of neighbors and fellow New Yorkers caring for each other. At the peak of the crisis, over 1,200 people were coming through the Red Hook Initiative doors to charge phones, get a hot meal, pick up supplies, receive medical or legal support, and offer to help.

A Community Response to Hurricane Sandy